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20130214
20130214
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. zeno of elea, who predated aristotle, wrote a series of paradoxes that still give us pause today. one of the best known tells the story of achilles and the tortoise and their race. achilles is such a fast runner, he gives the tortoise a head start. they each run at constant speeds: achilles very fast, the tortoise very slow. after a finite amount of time, achilles gets to where the tortoise started, but the tortoise will have moved on. it takes achilles a finite amount of time to get to the tortoise's next spot, but by the time he arrives, the tortoise will have moved on from there as well. and so on, and so on, over and over again, ad infinitum. despite what our senses tell us, zeno is telling us that achilles will never catch the tortoise. zeno's paradoxes were a big problem for the greek philosophers, and they did just about everything they could to avoid confronting the infinite because they based their arithmetic and their entire worldview on something much more tangible: geometry. their notion of the mathematical and the physical was intimately linked to the practice of measurin
around us that seems bent on our creating our own demise? our sojourn through the wide, cool halls of the egyptian museum in cairo dramatically reinforces our three interrelated introductory class themes. rites of passage - in this case death - generate boundary questions - "where do i go when i die?" which is a pervasive human preoccupation from our most ancient civilizations up to the present. if nothing else, our mortality is the commonality that binds humanity together, and forces us to formulate religious answers to the sometimes overwhelming demands of our shared existence. faced with death, as are we all, the ancient egyptian pharaohs responded with unparalleled creative energy in their quest for immortality - from the magnificent statuary, elaborate burial masks, to the golden sarcophagus from tutankhamen's tomb, the visitor is struck by the egyptian response to death. of course, for most people, the pyramids of giza are ancient egypt. through the burial tombs for three pharaohs - a father, son, grandson trio who reigned during the 26th century before the common era - an eg
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2